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HomeNewsZoom’s Updated Terms Say It can now use Customer Data to Train...

Zoom’s Updated Terms Say It can now use Customer Data to Train AI 

Customer information on product usage, telemetry and diagnostic data, and other comparable material Zoom may now use to train its AI.

The most recent revisions to the terms of service state that Zoom intends to use some of customer data to train its artificial intelligence models. If you read through the conditions on software licensing, beta services, and compliance in the most recent revision to the video platform’s terms of service, the small print appears to indicate a significant choice Zoom made regarding its AI strategy. 

The modification, which became effective on July 27, gives Zoom the ability to use specific consumer data for developing and fine-tuning its AI or machine learning models. Customer information on product usage, telemetry and diagnostic data, and other comparable material or data gathered by the company are all examples of the “service-generated data” Zoom may now employ to train its AI. 

In accordance with the terms of Zoom, “You consent to Zoom’s access, use, collection, creation, modification, distribution, processing, sharing, maintenance, and storage of Service Generated Data for any purpose, to the extent and in the manner permitted by applicable Law, including for the purpose of machine learning or artificial intelligence (including for the purpose of training and tuning of algorithms and models).”

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Messages, files, and documents from customers do not appear to fall under this category. The company Zoom stated in a subsequent blog post that “for AI, we do not use audio, video, or chat content for training our models without customer consent.” 
The upgrade comes amid a heated public discussion over how much personal data, no matter how aggregated or anonymized, should be used to train AI systems. A large portion of online text or photos are used to train chatbots like OpenAI’s ChatGPT, Google’s Bard, and Microsoft’s Bing as well as image-generation programmes like Midjourney and Stable Diffusion. Recent months have seen a rise in legal actions brought by authors or creatives who claim to see their own work reflected in the results of generative AI tools.

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Sahil Pawar
Sahil Pawar
I am a graduate with a bachelor's degree in statistics, mathematics, and physics. I have been working as a content writer for almost 3 years and have written for a plethora of domains. Besides, I have a vested interest in fashion and music.

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